Bettina Judd | Author of Patient

Bettina Judd

Art. Feminism. Femme Fire.


Conversation with Mickalene Thomas
Jul
14
2:00 PM14:00

Conversation with Mickalene Thomas

The Henry is excited to welcome Mickalene Thomas for a conversation taking place in the galleries of MUSE: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête.  In conversation with artist, writer, and performer Dr. Bettina Judd, Thomas will address her work in relation to influential artists and communities of inspiration and will speak to the ways that concepts of beauty, pleasure, and interior space unfold through the photographs.

Mickalene Thomas (lives and works in Brooklyn, NY) makes paintings, collages, photography, video, and installations that draw on art history and popular culture to create a contemporary vision of female sexuality, beauty, and power. Blurring the distinction between object and subject, concrete and abstract, real and imaginary, Thomas constructs complex portraits, landscapes, and interiors in order to examine how identity, gender, and sense-of-self are informed by the ways women (and “feminine” spaces) are represented in art and popular culture. 

Dr. Bettina Judd is an interdisciplinary writer, artist, and performer whose research focuses on Black women's creative production and our use of visual art, literature, and music to develop feminist thought. She is currently Assistant Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington.

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SalonTalk - Opening Weekend for MUSE: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête
Jul
14
11:00 AM11:00

SalonTalk - Opening Weekend for MUSE: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête

Join Dr. Bettina Judd, Anastacia Renée, and Christa Bell for a morning of collective dialogue inspired by the exhibition, MUSE: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête. Designed to be a safe space for an intracommunity conversation among Black women and Black gender non-conforming folks, this will be an outdoor, salon-style gathering. Facilitators will present a family reunion-inspired approach to generate a warm and creatively conducive environment for discussing core themes that emerge in the artwork of Thomas and the tête-à-tête artists, particularly as it relates to the lives of Black women. 

Dr. Bettina Judd is an interdisciplinary writer, artist and performer whose research focuses on Black women's creative production and our use of visual art, literature, and music to develop feminist thought. She is currently Assistant Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington

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Reading with Derrick Weston Brown, Bennie Heron, and more!
May
25
7:00 PM19:00

Reading with Derrick Weston Brown, Bennie Heron, and more!

The line-up for this event features stellar poets from near and far! Join us for readings by Derrick Weston Brown, Bennie Heron, Bettina Judd, Quenton Baker, and Anastacia-Renee.

Derrick Weston Brown holds an MFA in creative writing, from American University, and his work has appeared in such literary journals as The Little Patuxent Review, Colorlines, The This Mag, and Vinyl online. He worked as a bookseller and book buyer for a bookstore operated by the nonprofit Teaching for Change; founded The Nine on the Ninth, a critically acclaimed monthly poetry series; and was the 2012-2013 Writer- In-Residence of the Howard County Poetry Literary Society. Currently, he is a participating DC area author for the PEN/Faulkner Foundation’s Writers-in- Schools program. He is a native of Charlotte, North Carolina, and resides in Mount Rainier, Maryland. His debut collection of poetry, Wisdom Teeth, was released in April 2011 on Busboys and Poets Press/PM Press. You can follow him on social media on Facebook and on Instagram @theoriginalDerrickWestonBrown as well as his author website www.DerrickWestonBrown.com

Bennie Herron was born in San Diego, CA to a blue-collar family. He had a challenging but fulfilling childhood rooted in unconditional love; this childhood is the undercurrent of his writing and social advocacy. He always knew and believed that one way he could transcend negative circumstances was through education, which would allow him to be a part of the solution regarding issues that plagued his community and the world alike. After obtaining a Bachelors in Psychology at San Diego State University, he later went on to obtain a masters in social work. Most recently he received his MFA in creative writing with an emphasis in contemporary poetry from National University. In 2012, his first full-length poetry collection greens was published by Tintavox Independent Press. In February 2018, he released a collection of prose and poems titled word to mother with West Vine Press. The poems are a reflection of his attempt to add on and never take away.

Bettina Judd, Assistant Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington, is an interdisciplinary writer, artist, and performer whose research focus is on Black women’s creative production and our use of visual art, literature, and music to develop Black feminist thought. Her collection of poems on the history of medical experimentation on Black women titled Patient. won the 2013 Black Lawrence Press Hudson Book Prize.

Quenton Baker is a poet and educator from Seattle. His current focus is anti-blackness and the afterlife of slaver. His work has appeared in Jubilat, Vinyl, Apogee, Pinwheel, Poetry Northwest, The James Franco Review, and Cura and in the anthologies Measure for Measure: An Anthology of Poetic Meters and It Was Written: Poetry Inspired by Hip-Hop. He has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Southern Maine and is a two-time Pushcart Prize nominee. He is a 2017 Jack Straw fellow and is the recipient of a James W. Ray Venture Project award from Artist Trust. His first collection, This Glittering Republic, came out from Willow Books in 2016.

Anastacia-Reneé is Civic Poet of Seattle and former 2015-2017 Poet-in-Residence at Hugo House. She is a hybrid genre writer, workshop facilitator and multivalent performance artist. She is the author of four books: Forget It (Black Radish Books), (v.), (Gramma Press), Answer(Me) (Argus Press), and 26 (Dancing Girl Press) and her poetry, prose and fiction have been published widely.

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Seattle Erotic Arts Festival
Apr
28
6:15 PM18:15

Seattle Erotic Arts Festival

  • At the Seattle Center Exhibition Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Seattle Erotic Art Festival is known worldwide for its comprehensive collection of international fine art celebrating the diversity of human sexual expression. The incredible creativity with which artists approach the subject of erotica is captured in all manner of visual media: painting, photography, sculpture, assemblage, prints, mixed media, and more. The Seattle Erotic Art Festival, now in its 16th year, is more than just an art show; it’s an interactive experience with lectures by amazing educators like Bettina Judd and Ms. Briq House, art tours with festival artists, a class on flirting skillfully with fans, and a myriad of ways for patrons to experience art. And remember, observation is a valid form of participation and consent is always respected.

World class performances await you, both on and off the stages. Local performance luminaries Luminous Pariah, Namii, Lowa De Boom Boom, Alyza DelPan-Monley, and San Francisco’s Shay Tiziano as the festival’s guest curators will blow you away with their exciting stage shows!

Interactive performance art at the Festival breaks the 4th wall by using the entirety of the festival space as the stage, as well as offering patrons a chance to become part of the performances. Interactive performers engage directly with our guests, creating an immersive environment.

We are proud to present world-class erotic art that is rarely seen in mainstream culture and redefines boundaries in exciting new ways. Get your tickets now to experience our delightful world of erotic art!

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POP Conference - Like a Moth to a Flame Burned by the Fire:  Recognizing Black Women’s Complexities in Popular Music
Apr
28
1:45 PM13:45

POP Conference - Like a Moth to a Flame Burned by the Fire: Recognizing Black Women’s Complexities in Popular Music

with Regina N. Bradley, Timothy Anne Burnside, Bettina Judd, and Fredara M. Hadley  

Conference Janet Jackson’s 1993 sultry remake of the song “That’s the Way Love Goes” opens with the line “Like a moth to a flame burned by the fire.” While Jackson is talking about the ups and downs of how love manifests itself, the imagery of the moth being burned by a flame also applies to how Black women attempt to view and position themselves in American society. Of particular interest is how Black women hold a peculiar space in popular culture: their bodies and cultural expressions are emulated, their style duplicated, but no room is made to recognize their agency. They are, in essence, burned by the very flame that they are attempting to master. The imposed expectations and biases placed upon black women about how to perform race, (hyper)sexuality, and class –in all senses of the word – also impact their autonomy.  Black women’s search for space in memory, in culture, and in themselves is especially significant in popular music.

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Keynote: 12th Annual Research Colloquium Portland State University Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies Department
Apr
13
11:30 AM11:30

Keynote: 12th Annual Research Colloquium Portland State University Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies Department

  • Portland State University (SMSU 327/8/9) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Now in its 12th year, the WGSS Student Research Colloquium offers an intimate conference setting to highlight the intersectional work of undergraduate and graduate students (of any year and department) across many fields and disciplines. It is a chance for students to share their research and gain firsthand experience presenting about issues related to feminist and queer studies that matter to them. Students who attend but don’t present learn about their peers’ scholarship and engage with cutting-edge issues.

This colloquium offers a platform for students and faculty to explore the intersection of feminism, sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity, age, ability, education-level, socioeconomic status, and religion through inspired student work across many fields, disciplines, and conversations.

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A Night of Black Women Magic & Multi-Genre Writing
Feb
10
7:00 PM19:00

A Night of Black Women Magic & Multi-Genre Writing

Join us for an evening of Black Woman magic & multi-genre writing featuring Natalie Graham, Bettina Judd, Reagan Jackson and Anastacia-Renee.

A native of Gainesville, Florida, Natalie Graham earned her M.F.A. in Creative Writing at the University of Florida and Ph.D. in American Studies at Michigan State University. Her poems have appeared in Callaloo, New England Review, Valley Voices: A Literary Review, and Southern Humanities Review; and her articles have appeared in The Journal of Popular Culture and Transition. She is a Cave Canem fellow and associate professor of African American Studies at California State University, Fullerton. Begin with a Failed Body, her first full-length collection of poems, won the 2016 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. You can find her at nataliejgraham.com or on social media @NatalieJoGraham.

Born in Baltimore and raised in Southern California, Dr. Bettina A. Judd is an interdisciplinary researcher, writer, artist, and performer. She is an alumna of Spelman College and the University of Maryland and is currently Assistant Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at The University of Washington, Seattle.

Anastacia-Renee is Civic Poet of Seattle and former 2015-2017 Poet-in-Residence at Hugo House. She is the author of four books: Forget It (Black Radish Books), (v.), (Gramma Press), Answer(Me) (Argus Press), and 26 (Dancing Girl Press), and her poetry, prose and fiction have been published widely.

Reagan Jackson is the Program Manager for Young Women Empowered. She is a writer, artist, activist, international educator and award winning journalist. She's been a regular contributor to the Seattle Globalist since 2013. Her self published works include two children's books (Coco LaSwish: A Fish from a Different Rainbow and Coco LaSwish: When Rainbows Go Blue) and three collections of poetry (God, Hair, Love, and America, Love and Guatemala, and Summoning Unicorns). To find out more check her out at www.rejjarts.com.

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Speak to Me Volume II
Jan
25
6:00 PM18:00

Speak to Me Volume II

Seattle Civic Poet Anastacia-Renee presents Speak to Me! Volume II.

A poetry reading featuring me, Rezina Habtemariam, and Lashaunycee O'Cain.

Speak to Me! is a free monthly intergenerational reading series showcasing poets and writers. Stay after the readings for an optional 30-minute generative writing workshop led by Anastacia-Renee and guest facilitators.

Speak to Me! Volume II features Bettina Judd, Rezina Habtemariam, and youth poet Lashaunycee O’Cain, with poems and words from ancestor poet Audre Lorde read by Anastacia-Renee.

 

RSVP at the facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1483378211773466/

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Lack(ing) a History and Producing Just Narratives: Henrietta Lacks and the telling of Black Women’s Life Stories (NWSA)
Nov
17
1:15 PM13:15

Lack(ing) a History and Producing Just Narratives: Henrietta Lacks and the telling of Black Women’s Life Stories (NWSA)

With: Moya Bailey, Ruha Benjamin and Whitney Peoples

Rebecca Skloot’s book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks tells the story of Lacks and the tremendous impact of her cells on medical research, discovery, and innovation. The book has won numerous awards, generated wealth for Skloot, and is now an HBO movie starring Oprah Winfrey.This roundtable explores this text to answer the conference theme’s primary question of “how do we make Black lives matter in our own feminist research and praxis?” By critically interrogating Skloot’s methodological and ethical choices in telling Lacks’s story, critics in this session unpack how contemporary and historical narratives of Black lives are constructed.

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Gender, Women’s, and Feminist Studies PhD Interest Group/Women of Color Caucus: Black Feminist Thought and Womanism in the PhD (NWSA)
Nov
17
8:00 AM08:00

Gender, Women’s, and Feminist Studies PhD Interest Group/Women of Color Caucus: Black Feminist Thought and Womanism in the PhD (NWSA)

Panel with: Moya Bailey, Northeastern University; Janell Coreen Hobson, State University of New York, Albany; Karen Flynn, University of Illinois; Grace Adeniyi Ogunyankin, Carleton University

Gender, Women’s, and Feminist Studies PhD programs often train doctoral students in intersectionality via the canonical work of Black Feminist and Womanist thinkers. Yet, we rarely wrestle with the relationship between Black Feminist Thought and GWFS as a field much less discuss how Black feminists/womanists navigate doctoral programs in GWFS (either as students or faculty members) that have perpetuated anti-Blackness. This roundtable explores the intertwining, fraught, and sometimes contentious relationship between Black Feminist Thought/Womanism and the PhD in Gender, Women, and Feminist Studies.

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“A Hard Town By The Sea” Feminist of Color Science, Health, Medicine, and Technology Studies in Baltimore Workshop (NWSA)
Nov
15
11:45 AM11:45

“A Hard Town By The Sea” Feminist of Color Science, Health, Medicine, and Technology Studies in Baltimore Workshop (NWSA)

With Diana Louis

In this workshop, we collaborate to build tools for engaging literature and creative practice as a critical way to interrogate how a feminist of color science, health, medicine, technology studies framework may be useful interrogating how medical abuse on communities of color provide complex ethical problems. Access to medical histories of vulnerable communities for research demonstrates how the private bodies of Black women become public property. This workshop is developed to build tools, a Black feminist bioethics, for interrogating the abuses of medical and scientific institutions by putting the lives of women of color at the center of such interrogations.

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Reading with t’ai freedom ford, Bettina Judd & Imani Sims
Aug
20
2:00 PM14:00

Reading with t’ai freedom ford, Bettina Judd & Imani Sims

We're so excited to be hosting these three tremendous poets! Don't miss your chance to hear original work by t’ai freedom ford, Bettina Judd, and Imani Sims. 

*Please note that the start time is earlier than usual (at 5:00 pm). 

Bios:

t’ai freedom ford is a New York City high school English teacher, Cave Canem Fellow and two-time Pushcart Prize nominee. Her poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in No, Dear, The African American Review, Gulf Coast, Vinyl, Muzzle, RHINO, Poetry and others. Her work has also been featured in several anthologies including The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop. In 2012 and 2013, she completed two multi-city tours as a part of a queer women of color literary salon, The Revival. In 2014, she was the winner of The Feminist Wire’s inaugural poetry contest judged by Evie Shocklee. She was a 2015 Center for Fiction Fellow and the Poetry Project’s 2016 Emerge-Surface-Be Poetry fellow. Winner of the 2015 To the Lighthouse Poetry Prize, her first poetry collection, how to get over is available from Red Hen Press. t’ai lives and loves in Brooklyn, but hangs out digitally at: shesaidword.com

Bettina Judd is an interdisciplinary writer, artist, and performer whose research focus is on Black women's creative production and our use of visual art, literature, and music to develop Black feminist thought. Her collection ofpoems on the history of medical experimentation on Black women titled Patient won the 2013 Black Lawrence Press Hudson Book Prize. She is currently Assistant Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Imani Sims is a fine wine and bourbon loving Seattle native who spun her first performance poem at the age of fourteen. She believes in the healing power of words and the transformational nuance of the human story. Imani works to empower youth and adults through various writing courses and interdisciplinary shows all over the nation. Her book (A)live Heart is available on Sibling Rivalry Press

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POP Conference
Apr
22
6:00 AM06:00

POP Conference

I will be a part of this roundtable on Pop Music and Politics with Ali Colleen Neff, Barry Shank, Christine Bacareza Balance, Maria Elena Buszek, Nadine Hubbs, and Guthrie P. Ramsey Jr.

Music and politics. These are both highly contested terms, difficult to define despite the fact that we use them constantly. To place them in relation to each other is to destabilize them even more, and to intensify the issues they raise. This panel interrogates the common-sense understandings of these keywords to locate the politics that inhabit hidden spaces, affective exchanges, aesthetics, postures, and embodiments. Beyond the notion that musical politics are something we know when we see them—or, rather, hear them, we are, following the movements and skeptics subcategory of the CFP, interested in amplifying politics beyond particular artists’ “strategic choices of mannerism, vocality, sound, and style.” 

Much scholarly and fan concern with the union of music and politics is centered on social movements. The long Civil Rights Movement is the iconic example of the significance of music’s embrace of politics and politics’ return of that gesture. Photos of open-mouthed, arm-crossed, hand-holding singers like Bernice Johnson and Joan Baez focus the gaze of our cultural memory, representing for many misty-eyed hopes of popular music standing on the side of justice. These are the “Big-P” politics of civic transformation: politics at their most legible. But what of the “little-p” politics that determine how people relate to each other, their social worlds, their ecologies? 

Here, we examine the cases in which the positive political effect of music is not so clear-cut; interrogating the assumption that song authorship is the primary space for political work, and emphasizing the fact that the intersection of music and politics is not always hopeful or good. Music has been used as an instrument of torture. Sometimes it sounds political stasis, against popular liberation. 

Skepticism is not cynicism, however, and our roundtable embraces the positive critical aspect of that skepticism by asking foundational questions—What do we mean by politics? How do we recognize the presence of politics in music? Is it reducible to the songs sung in support of social movements? Must it refer to the music that inspires previously ignored or ridiculed peoples to stand up and proclaim the beauty and power of their identities, or the plaints that articulate the injustices of state policies or the destructions caused by warring states. Must the intersection of politics and music be based in identity categories? Must the political use of music always have a specific aim in mind? Might love songs have their political ramifications?

This roundtable will approach these questions with no firm answers in mind. Participants come from a series of backgrounds and approaches, from songwriting, to ethnography, to critical theory.

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Cave Canem Reading
Feb
8
4:00 PM16:00

Cave Canem Reading

Hear what our fellows have to say! Join us at AWP-D.C. for our annual Off-Site Reading, hosted by Howard University’s WHUT Radio Station, headlined by Howard alumni Amaud Jamal Johnson, Toni Asante Lightfoot and John Murillo. Another 20 poets will share innovative work in four-minute, rapid-fire intervals. D.C.-based fellow Katy Richey will emcee. A donation of $10—or more!—upon entry benefits Cave Canem Foundation. Space is limited: Buy your ticket now and reserve your place (Click the link for tickets, select “Other Program” and note “AWP Fellows Reading”).

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Womanhood, The Body, and Home
Feb
8
10:00 AM10:00

Womanhood, The Body, and Home

Wednesday, February 8, 1 – 2:00 p.m., Germantown Campus Library

Germantown professor and poet Kateema Lee is bringing three other African-American women poets to the Germantown Campus to read their work: Bettina Judd, Maya Marshall and DéLana R. A. Dameron.  Ms. Dameron’s collection, How God Ends Us, received the South Carolina Poetry Book Prize in 2008; Ms. Judd won the 2013 Hudson Prize for her collection Patient; Ms. Marshall is the editor of the Yemassee Journal; and Professor Lee has a forthcoming book titled Almost Invisible.

 

The four poets are all Cave Canem Fellows.  You can read more about the visiting poets and Cave Canem on their Web sites:

http://www.bettinajudd.com

https://delanaradameron.com

http://mayamarshallpoetry.com

http://cavecanempoets.org

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The Watering Hole Faculty Reading
Dec
27
3:30 PM15:30

The Watering Hole Faculty Reading

2016 Watering Hole Poetry Retreat Faculty Reading (free and open to the public featuring Evie Shockley, Lamar Wilson, Dasan Ahanu and Bettina Judd
These free events are a part of our 4th Annual Poetry Retreat

Free Poetry Events in Santee!
1. Tuesday, December 27 from 6:30-8 p.m. Poetry Reading by
Retreat Facilitators Evie Shockley, Bettina Judd, & Lamar
Wilson. This event will be at the Village Round in Santee State
Park.

2. Thursday, December 29 7-7:45 p.m., poet Sharan Strange,
who is an Orangeburg native, will give the retreat's annual
Lecture Series keynote address. This event will be at the
Village Round in Santee State Park.

3. Thursday, December 29 7:45-8:30 p.m. Final Reading for all
retreat participants. This event will be at the Village Round in
Santee State Park.

These events are free and open to the public.
For information visit our website www.twhpoetry.org, email
jennifer@twhpoetry.org or call 843-625- 0822.

Santee State Park, 251 State Park RD, Santee, S.C. 29142

The Watering Hole is a nonprofit, Southern-based poetry collective for poets of color. TWH will be hosting its 4th annual Poetry Retreat at Santee State Park from December 26-30. Poets from across the country come to this retreat and TWH would like to invite all to come to its public events.

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The Portrait in the Persona: Rendering and Memory in the History of Experimentation and Display on Anarcha, Betsey, Lucy, and Joice
Nov
19
10:15 AM10:15

The Portrait in the Persona: Rendering and Memory in the History of Experimentation and Display on Anarcha, Betsey, Lucy, and Joice

BLACK PORTRAITURES CONFERENCE

This conference presentation includes a complimentary eChap for those in attendance. It will be available for download on the day of the presentation.

The mid-nineteenth century was witness to an enlightenment influenced curiosity of Black bodies globally: Sarah Baartman in the 1810s, Anarcha, Betsey, and Lucy in the 1840s and Joice Heth during this time as well. This reading of poems and commentary from my poetry collection PATIENT. attempts to render these women through persona poems by addressing the following questions: How might the inner lives of these women be recovered? Who has the authority to puppet the voices of these women in an attempt to render them whole? What does the effort to render Black women whole say about how we, in the present, inherit and are haunted by the legacies of enslavement, colonial conquest and experimentation on Black women’s bodies? This presentation includes a commentary on the process of rendering Black women in poetics and a reading of the poems themselves.

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“Out my Mind, Just in Time:” Excavating Foundations of a Black Feminist Health Science Studies
Nov
13
8:00 AM08:00

“Out my Mind, Just in Time:” Excavating Foundations of a Black Feminist Health Science Studies

  • National Women's Studies Association Annual Converence (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Drawing on African American Studies, History, Disability Studies and Women's and Gender Studies, we imagine an alternate framework for thinking about health, the body, illness, and wellness, particularly for the lives of Black women. We understand this roundtable to be in critical conversation with the roundtable Black Feminist Health Science Studies Futures: A Roundtable on All the Various Ways We Trying to Get Free

Moderator: Moya Bailey

Presenters: Ruha Benjamin, Whitney A. Peoples, Diana Louis

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Decolonial Pedagogies: Bodies and Border-Crossings (part two)
Nov
11
2:15 PM14:15

Decolonial Pedagogies: Bodies and Border-Crossings (part two)

  • National Women's Studies Association Annual Conference (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This two-part roundtable seeks to open up new conversations on the ways in which embodied interventions and border-crossings are deeply implicated, even required, in pegaogies that seek to imagine transformative politics by internalizing a rigorous commitment to decoloniality. The proposed panels will ask what it means to denaturalize settler colonial logics by critically exploring dominant vocabularies about power and pedagogy and by troubling normative ideas about embodiment, identity, subjectivity, and agency.

 

Moderator: 

Richa Nagar, University of Minnesota

 

Co-panelists: 

Sam Bullington, University of Colorado, Boulder

Elora Halim Chowdhury, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Patricia DeRocher, Champlain College

Min Sook Lee, Ontario College of Art and Design University

Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley, University of Texas, Austin

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In your ear
Mar
20
12:00 PM12:00

In your ear

  • 2438 18th Street Northwest Washington, DC, 20009 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

$5 at the door // free for DCAC members

Born in Baltimore and raised in Southern California, Bettina Judd is an interdisciplinary writer, artist and performer. She is an alumna ofSpelman College and the University of Maryland and is currently Visiting Assistant Professor of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies at the College of WIlliam and Mary. She has received fellowships from the Five Colleges, The Vermont Studio Center and the University of Maryland. She is a Cave Canem Fellow and has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize in poetry. Her poems have appeared in Torch, Mythium, Meridians and other journals and anthologies. Most recently, her collection of poems titled Patient. won the Black Lawrence Press Hudson Book Prize and was published in November of 2014. She has been invited to perform for audiences in Vancouver, Washington, DC, Atlanta, Paris, New York, and Mumbai.

Carabella Sands is a photo editor at Hobart, the art editor at Witch Craft Magazine, and the author and illustrator of THEEEEL's weekly column, Mermaids Doing Things. Born and raised in Baltimore, she grew up in the foster system and didn't wear shoes until she was 23. Someday she will be a fly girl like Jennifer Lopez.

Rod Smith is the author of Touché (Wave Books, 2015), What's the Deal?(Song Cave, 2010), Deed (University of Iowa Press, 2007), and several other books. He edits the journal Aerial, publishes Edge Books, and manages Bridge Street Books in Washington DC. Smith edited The Selected Letters of Robert Creeley (U. Cal., 2014) with Peter Baker and Kaplan Harris. He has taught writing at the Corcoran College of Art & Design, George Mason University, and The Iowa Writers' Workshop, and currently teaches at The Maryland Institute of Contemporary Art.

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© Bettina Judd 2014-2018. All rights reserved.